Degree Requirements

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Download the PDF version of the PhD course requirements.

EMD PhD Guidelines 

The Ph.D. degree with a concentration in Epidemiology of Microbial Diseases requires ten courses for credit. Courses in biostatistics, epidemiology, and microbiology are strongly recommended. The specific course recommendations depend on the background of each student and their stated research interests. An individual program that includes courses, seminars, and research rotations is developed by the student and his/her faculty academic advisor. All students are required to complete three distinct research rotations. These are done in the fall, spring and summer between the first and second year. At the end of each rotation, the student will be asked to prepare a brief presentation for fellow students and faculty about their research for that term. These research rotations (EMD 670) are graded and account for three of the required ten courses EMD students must take. 

Students are required to complete course work in epidemiology (EMD508a or CDE516b). In addition, students must complete coursework that introduces them to the breadth of public health (EPH 608, Frontiers in Public Health). Students entering the program with an MPH are exempt from EPH 608, Frontiers in Public Health. Students with prior graduate level epidemiology courses may be exempt from coursework in epidemiology. 

The following courses are suggested courses that are appropriate for Ph.D. students in EMD. However, other courses at the Yale School of Public Health of in other departments may also be appropriate.

SUGGESTED COURSES TO FULFILL DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

Course Units  

CDE508/EMD508a, Principles of Epidemiology I

1

CDE 516b, Principles of Epidemiology II       

1

EMD 538a, Quantitative Methods for Infectious Disease Epidemiology

1

EMD 539b, Public Health Surveillance

1

EMD/CDE 543a, Global Aspects of Food and Nutrition

1

EMD 548b, Observing Earth from Space

1

EMD 550b/682b, Biology of Insect Disease Vectors

1

EMD 553b, Transmission Dynamic Models for Understanding Infectious Diseases

 

EMD 567a, Tackling the Big Three: Malaria, TB, & HIV in Resource-Limited Settings

1

EMD 680a, Advanced Topics in Tropical Parasitic Diseases

1

HPM 570a, Cost-Effectiveness Analysis and Decision Making

1

*CBIO 602a, Molecular Cell Biology

1

† F&ES 500a, Landscape Ecology

1

*PATH650b, Cellular and Molecular Biology of Cancer

1

EPH 600b, Research Ethics and Responsibilities          

0

EPH 608b, Frontiers in Public Health

1

Students participate in three distinct research rotations as noted by
registering for EMD 670 (fall, spring and summer)

 

EMD 670a, Advanced Research Laboratories

1

EMD 670b, Advanced Research Laboratories

1

EMD 670a, Advanced Research Laboratories (register for this in the fall
of second year; this rotation is the summer rotation done between first & second year)

1

Other Courses taken but not listed (as agreed upon by advisor)

 

1

1

1

1

*These courses are offered in the School of Medicine 

†This course is offered in the School of Forestry & Environmental Studies Students supported by training grants may be subject to additional requirements and should discuss this with the Principal Investigator of that grant to determine whether there are grant-specific requirements. 

rev. 7.28.2016

Research Rotations

Three research training modules are required for all students and each term involves a different investigator. These are offered as formal courses, and there will be a brief presentation to the division at the end of each rotation. Each term is graded. Investigators act as tutors and monitor the progress of the work, although students are given a certain amount of independence in their work. Research rotations are defined broadly, including experiments in the more traditional wet laboratory setting, as well as work in the field or on the computer.

Qualifying Examinations

EMD has adopted an oral and written qualifying examination format. Components of the examination include the following: (1) readings with committee members on selected topics; these readings may require review and integration of course work, laboratory rotations, research seminars, and published literature; and (2) a research proposal in the proposed dissertation topic.  In addition, each student will be asked to choose two other topics of interest to research.  Ideally, the two other topics are areas which will expand the dissertation topic to subject matters not covered in coursework.  The research topic is selected by the student and the advisor, and submitted within a prescribed time frame in written form. The examination takes the form of questions from members of the committee based on readings and an oral defense of both research proposals.

Detailed information regarding the EMD program is available from the EMD representative to the Graduate Studies Executive Committee or the coordinator of graduate student affairs.