Current PhD Students

Please note: This directory does not include all the current PhD students in this department.

E-Shien Chang

E-Shien Chan
Year started: 2016

E-maile-shien.chang@yale.edu

Research interest: E-Shien (Iggy) Chang is a PhD student in Chronic Disease Epidemiology with a concentration in Social and Behavioral Sciences. Iggy’s research interests are the psycho-social and cultural determinants of health in later life and community-engaged participatory research, with a focus on addressing health disparities in the aging population. Her research also encompasses minority aging in the areas of mental health, social relationships, and elder abuse, utilizing both quantitative and qualitative methods. Prior to coming to Yale, Iggy served as the research manager for the Chinese Health, Aging, and Policy Program, Rush University Medical Center, where she coordinated and conducted research in various social-behavioral, epidemiological, and intervention studies pertaining the psycho-social well-being of Chinese American families. Iggy holds a BA in Journalism from National Chengchi University, Taiwan, and a MA in Sociology from the University of Chicago. 

Selected publications: 

  • Chang ES., Beck T., Simon MA., Dong XQ. (2014) A psychometric assessment of the psychological and social well-being indicators in the PINE study. Journal of Aging and Health 26 (7): 1116-1136 
  • Chang ES, Dong XQ (2014). Understanding elder abuse in the Chinese community: the role of cultural, social and community factors. In: Taylor R., editor. Elder Abuse and Its Prevention. Washington DC: National Academies Press. 53-58.

Jaclyn White Hughto

Year started: 2014

E-mail:  jaclyn.white@yale.edu

Research interests: Jaclyn White Hughto, MPH, is a doctoral student in Chronic Disease Epidemiology at the Yale School of Public Health. Her research includes understanding the social, spatial, and individual-level risk factors driving health inequities in sexual and gender minorities. She is also interested in identifying strategies to increase the uptake of biomedical interventions and developing behavioral interventions to prevent adverse sexual and psychosocial health outcomes in at-risk populations. Mrs. White Hughto has worked with Fenway Health in Boston since 2010 managing and conducting research studies and intervention trials with diverse Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) populations. She earned her MPH in Behavioral Science and Health Education from the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University and a Bachelor’s degree in Psychology from Boston University. Her mentor is Dr. John Pachankis. 

Selected publications

  • White, J.M., Mimiaga, M. J., Krakower, D. S., & Mayer, K. H. (2012). Evolution of Massachusetts physician attitudes, knowledge and experience regarding the use of antiretrovirals for HIV prevention. AIDS Patient Care and STDs, 26(7), 395-405. 
  • White, J.M., Dunham, E., Rowley, B.R., Reisner, S.L., & Mimiaga, M.J. (2015) Sexually explicit racialised media targeting men who have sex with men online: A content analysis of high-risk behaviour depicted in online advertisements. Culture, Health and Sexuality, (ahead-of-print) 1-14. 

Website: http://cira.yale.edu/people/jaclyn-m-white-mph


Josefa Martinez

Year started: 2011

E-mail: josefa.martinez@yale.edu

Research interest:
Josefa Martinez is a doctoral student in the department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology in the School of Public Health. Her interest is in maternal and child public health nutrition, specifically, how community-based behavior change, health communication, and systems-level interventions can be used to encourage healthy lifestyle behaviors (e.g., breastfeeding) and the effects these interventions have on reducing the risk of overweight and obesity across the lifecycle. She is also interested in the application of social and behavioral theory to interventions designed to promote healthy lifestyle behaviors. Her dissertation is examining the consequences of excess gestational weight gain and the predictors of exclusive breastfeeding in low-income minority women. 

Selected publications

  • Martinez, J.L., Rivers, S.E., Duncan, L.R., Bertoli, M.C., Domingo, S., Latimer-Cheung, A.E., Salovey, P. (2013). Healthy Eating for Life: Rationale and Development of an English as a Second Language (ESL) Curriculum for Promoting Healthy Nutrition. Translational Behavioral Medicine. Vol. 3(4): 426-33. PMCID: PMC3830010. 
  • Martinez, J.L., Duncan, L.R., Rivers, S.E., Latimer, A.E., Salovey, P. (2013). Examining the use of message tailoring to promote physical activity among medically underserved adults. Journal of Health Psychology. Vol. 18(4): 470-476. PMCID: PMC3565037

Raul Ulises Hernandez-Ramirez, M.Sc.

Year started: 2013

E-mail: raul.hernandezramirez@yale.edu

Research interest: Raul Ulises has been involved in epidemiology research for a decade. He is currently preparing his doctoral dissertation, with a focus on cancer epidemiology, and working as a graduate research assistant with Dr. Robert Dubrow. His current research focuses on cancer risk among people infected with HIV, particularly on examining patterns of cancer risk in the modern antiretroviral era, and evaluating associations of HIV markers and antiretroviral therapy with cancer risk. He has conducted part of his dissertation research as a summer visiting fellow in the National Cancer Institute. Before coming to Yale, he gained substantial research experience in nutrition, environment, and cancer at the National Institute of Public Health of Mexico. He also has been involved in teaching graduate courses in epidemiology and nutrition at Yale, and quantitative and research methods in Mexico. He holds a B.Sc. in Nutrition and a M.Sc. in Epidemiology, and received training in nutritional and exercise sciences, and nutritional and environmental epidemiology in different settings. In addition, Raul Ulises is a level 1 member of Mexico’s National Researchers System.
   
Selected publications:

  • Park LS, Hernández-Ramírez RU, Silverberg MJ, Crothers K, Dubrow R. Prevalence of non-HIV cancer risk factors in persons living with HIV/AIDS: a meta-analysis. AIDS. 2016;30(2):273-91 
  • Hernández-Ramírez RU, Galván-Portillo MV, Ward MH, Agudo A, González CA, Oñate-Ocaña LF, Herrera-Goepfert R, Palma-Coca O, López-Carrillo L. Dietary intake of polyphenols, nitrate and nitrite and gastric cancer risk in Mexico City. International journal of cancer. 2009;125(6):1424-30. 
Website: LinkedIn

Margaret Mayer

Magge Mayer
Year started: 2016

E-mail: margaret.mayer@yale.edu

Research interest: Margaret (Maggie) Mayer, MPH, is a doctoral student in the Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology at the Yale School of Public Health. Her research interests include understanding patterns of tobacco product use among adolescents, with a focus on emerging tobacco products. Maggie works with the Yale Tobacco Center of Regulatory Science, using the nationally representative Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) study as a primary source of data. More broadly, she is interested in cancer prevention and control. She earned her MPH in Chronic Disease Epidemiology at the Yale School of Public Health in 2016, and her BS in Molecular and Cell Biology from the University of Connecticut in 2014. Her mentor is Dr. Marney White.


Samantha A. Streicher

Year started: 2011

E-mail: Samantha.Streicher@yale.edu

Research interest:
Samantha is a pre-doctoral student in the Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology. She is currently working on her dissertation under the mentorship of Dr. Harvey Risch. Her research interests include risk factors for and prevention of pancreatic cancer, genetic epidemiology of cancer, and methods and tools for analyzing genetic data.

Selected publications

  • Streicher SA, Yu H, Lu L, Kidd MS, Risch HA. Case Control Study of Aspirin Use and Risk of Pancreatic Cancer. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2014 June 26; Epub ahead of print.

Phoebe Tran

Phoebe Tran

Year Started: 2016

E-mail:phoebe.tran@yale.edu

Research interests: Currently, I am interested in exploring the impact of socioeconomic inequalities and health knowledge disparities in cardiovascular health outcomes using spatial methods. 

Selected Publications:

  • Tran, Phoebe and Tran, Lam (2016). Validating Negative Binomial Lyme Disease Regression Model with Bootstrap Resampling. Environmental Modelling & Software 
  • Tran, Phoebe and Waller, Lance (2013). Effects of Climate and Landscape Fragmentation on Lyme Disease Incidence in the Northeastern United States. EcoHealth, 10(4): 394-404.

Tiara C. Willie

Year started: 2014

E-mail: tiara.willie@yale.edu

Research interest: Tiara C. Willie is a NIMH predoctoral fellow in the Interdisciplinary HIV Prevention Training Program at the Center for Interdisciplinary Research on AIDS. She earned her B.S. in Biology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and her M.A. in Women’s Studies at Southern Connecticut State University and. Her master’s thesis, My Existence is My Activism: Evaluating the Self-Manifestation of Strength amongst Women Experiencing Intimate Partner Violence, used empowerment theory to examine women’s perceived strength and locus of control among community women experiencing intimate partner violence. Her research focuses on building knowledge on gender-based violence (GBV) and HIV/AIDS from an intersectionality framework. Her nascent program of research explores the implications of individual, relationship, community, and structural- level determinants of GBV on the sexual and reproductive health of marginalized women, domestically and globally. This empirically informed research would be used to construct GBV and HIV prevention interventions. Her mentors are Dr. Trace Kershaw and Dr. Jhumka Gupta.

Selected publications

  • Sullivan, T.P., Willie, T., Fisher, B.S. (2013). Highlights and Lowlights of Researcher-Practitioner Collaborations in the Criminal Justice System, Findings from the Researcher-Practitioner Partnerships Study (RPPS) (NIJ 243914). Washington, D.C.: National Institute of Justice, Office of Justice Programs.