Current PhD Students

Megan Cahill

Year started: 2014

E-mail: megan.cahill@yale.edu

My research interests are in exploring differing levels of susceptibility to infectious diseases, with ongoing projects examining genetic susceptibility to severe West Nile and Dengue disease.



Hanna Ehrlich

Hanna Ehrlich

Year started: 2016

E-mailhanna.ehrlich@yale.edu

I am interested in the eco-epidemiology of vector-borne and zoonotic diseases. My previous research includes modeling spatial-temporal risks to viral diseases transmitted by mosquitos in Australia, informing an environmental surveillance system for cholera in India, and studying the responses to West Nile Virus on avian communities in the Midwest United States. At Yale, my current focus is understanding the environmental and social determinants of antimalarial drug resistance transmission in Sub-Saharan Africa.

Alyssa Parpia

Year started: 2016

E-mail: alyssa.parpia@yale.edu

Alyssa is interested in modeling the impact of public health interventions on mitigating infectious disease spread, particularly among vulnerable populations. Specifically, she seeks to use dynamic transmission models and other mathematical modeling techniques to estimate how climate change affects the spread and intensity of water-borne disease outbreaks in developing countries. Alyssa also intends on quantifying the disproportionate communicable disease burden among climate refugee populations compared to non-refugee populations.

Selected publications:

  •   Parpia AS*, Ndeffo-Mbah ML*, Wenzel NS, Galvani AP. 2016. Impact of response to the 2014-2015 Ebola outbreak on outcomes of malaria, HIV, and tuberculosis, West Africa. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 22(3):433-441. DOI: 10.3201/eid2203.150977. 
  •   Parpia AS, Li Y, Chen C, Dhar B, Crowcroft NS. 2016. Encephalitis, Ontario, Canada, 2002-2013. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 22(3):426-432. DOI: 10.3201/eid2203.151545. 

Websitehttps://scholar.google.com/citations?user=aYQZBbYAAAAJ&hl=en

Kayoko Shioda

Kayoko Shioda

Year started: 2016

E-mail: kayoko.shioda@yale.edu

Kayoko Shioda, DVM, MPH is a doctoral student in the Department of Epidemiology of Microbial Diseases at Yale. She is interested in using mathematical modeling to advance our understanding of infectious disease dynamics. Her dissertation research focuses on the evaluation of the impact of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs) using time series data. She aims to provide quantitative evidence to support decision-making around the adoption and continued use of PCVs in various countries, especially resource-poor settings where the burden of hospitalization and death from pneumonia is greatest. Before starting Ph.D. training, she earned a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) from the University of Tokyo in 2012 and MPH from Emory University in 2014. She had worked in the Division of Viral Diseases at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, GA as an epidemiology fellow for two years. With her interest in translating evidence into practice, she has also been collaborating with government leaders and working for a start-up company, Blue Industries in Japan.

Selected publications:

  • Kayoko Shioda, Leslie Barclay, Sylvia Becker-Dreps, Filemon Bucardo-Rivera, Philip Cooper, Daniel C. Payne, Jan Vinjé, Benjamin A. Lopman: Can Use of Viral Load Improve Norovirus Clinical Diagnosis and Disease Attribution? Open forum infectious diseases. 08/2017; 4(3), DOI: 10.1093/ofid/ofx131
  • Kayoko Shioda, Leonard Cosmas, Allan Audi, Nicole Gregoricus, Jan Vinjé, Umesh D. Parashar, Joel M. Montgomery, Daniel R. Feikin, Robert F. Breiman, Aron J. Hall: Population-Based Incidence Rates of Diarrheal Disease Associated with Norovirus, Sapovirus, and Astrovirus in Kenya. PLoS ONE 04/2016; 11(4):e0145943., DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0145943 
  • Kayoko Shioda, Anita Kambhampati, Aron J Hall, Ben A Lopman: Global age distribution of pediatric norovirus cases. Vaccine 06/2015; 33(33)., DOI:10.1016/j.vaccine.2015.05.051

Websites

Maile Thayer Phillips

Maile Thayer Phillips

Year started: 2017

E-mail: maile.thayer@yale.edu   

Maile Thayer Phillips, MS is a PhD candidate at Yale’s Department of Epidemiology of Microbial Diseases. Before Yale, she earned her Master of Science degree in biostatistics from Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health in 2017 with a focus on infectious disease epidemiology. Prior to receiving her Masters, Phillips served in the United States Peace Corps in Sierra Leone where she worked on projects with malaria. In addition to West Africa, she has also worked in Peru, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, and Brazil. She is interested in employing a variety of mathematical modeling techniques to contribute to the field of infectious disease dynamics. Phillips has been involved in projects across the globe focusing on malaria, Ebola virus, Zika virus, Leishmaniasis, Staphylococcus aureus, and pneumococcus.