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Faculty - Chronic Disease Epidemiology

  • Judith Lichtman

    Department Chair and Professor of Epidemiology (Chronic Diseases); Co-director, Center for Neuroepidemiology and Clinical Neurological Research

    Research Interests
    • Epidemiology
    • Heart Diseases
    • Quality of Health Care
    • Research
    • Stroke
  • Mayur M. Desai

    Associate Professor of Epidemiology (Chronic Diseases); Associate Dean for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion, YSPH; Track Director, Applied Analytical Methods and Epidemiology, Online Executive MPH Program; Director, Advanced Professional MPH Program; Core Faculty, National Clinician Scholars Program

    Research Interests
    • Mental Disorders
    • Cardiovascular Diseases
    • Epidemiologic Methods
    • Health Services Research
    • Public Health
    • Quality of Health Care
    • Veterans
    • Global Health
    • Emigrants and Immigrants
  • Andrew Thomas DeWan

    Associate Professor of Epidemiology (Chronic Diseases); Director, Yale Center for Perinatal, Pediatric and Environmental Epidemiology, Chronic Disease Epidemiology

    Research Interests
    • Asthma
    • Chronic Disease
    • Epidemiology
    • Genetics
    • Leukemia
    • Norway
    • Pre-Eclampsia
    • Sepsis
    • Genetic Pleiotropy
  • Leah Ferrucci

    Assistant Professor of Epidemiology (Chronic Diseases)

    Research Interests
    • Breast Neoplasms
    • Chronic Disease
    • Diet
    • Epidemiology
    • Public Health
    • Skin Neoplasms
    • Tanning
    • Colorectal Neoplasms
    • Survivors
    • Metabolomics
  • Nicola Hawley

    Associate Professor of Epidemiology (Chronic Diseases)

    Research Interests
    • Diabetes Mellitus
    • Maternal Health Services
    • Maternal-Child Health Centers
    • Obesity
    • Pregnancy
    • Prenatal Care
    • Global Health
    • Samoa
    • American Samoa
  • Josephine Hoh

    Associate Professor of Epidemiology (Chronic Diseases) and of Ophthalmology and Visual Science

    Research Interests
    • Environmental Exposure
    • Environmental Health
    • Ophthalmology
  • Melinda Irwin

    Associate Dean of Research and Professor of Epidemiology (Chronic Diseases); Associate Cancer Center Director, Population Sciences; Co-Leader, Cancer Prevention and Control, Yale Cancer Center; Deputy Director (Public Health), Yale Center for Clinical Investigation

    Research Interests
    • Breast Neoplasms
    • Neoplasms by Histologic Type
    • Obesity
    • Ovarian Neoplasms
    • Weight Loss
    • Exercise
  • Xiaomei Ma

    Professor of Epidemiology (Chronic Diseases); Co-Leader, Cancer Prevention and Control

    Research Interests
    • Chronic Disease
    • Epidemiology
    • Leukemia
    • Lymphoma
    • Myelodysplastic Syndromes
    • Myeloproliferative Disorders
    • Neoplasms
  • Harvey Risch

    Professor of Epidemiology (Chronic Diseases)

    Research Interests
    • Esophageal Neoplasms
    • Ovarian Neoplasms
    • Pancreatic Neoplasms
    • Polymorphism, Genetic
    • Gonadal Steroid Hormones
    • Stomach Neoplasms
    • Helicobacter pylori
    • Molecular Epidemiology
    • Germ-Line Mutation
    • Host-Pathogen Interactions

Research Scientists

  • Brenda Cartmel

    Senior Research Scientist in and Lecturer in Epidemiology (Chronic Diseases)

    Research Interests
    • Carcinoma
    • Chronic Disease
    • Epidemiology
    • Nutrition Disorders
    • Ovarian Neoplasms
    • Stress, Psychological
    • Tanning
    • Disease-Free Survival
    • Nutritional Sciences

    Dr. Cartmel's primary research interests are in the area of cancer prevention and cancer survivorship. Dr. Cartmel is Co-Leader for the 'Personalized Intervention Program: Tobacco Treatment for Lung Cancer Screening Patients (PIP), one of four projects which are part of the Yale Lung SPORE (PI: Dr. Roy Herbst).  In addition to this study, Dr. Cartmel is involved in several diet and exercise intervention studies in cancer survivors (Melinda Irwin Ph.D. and Tara Sanft, M.D. PIs).  She is also participating in a nationwide longitudinal quality of life study in cancer survivors in which she is studying communication of health information to long-term cancer survivors. Other interests include the use of a novel noninvasive assessment method of skin carotenoids and skin cancer etiology and prevention, including work on tanning addiction.

     

  • Shahidul Islam

    Associate Research Scientist in Molecular Cellular and Developmental Biology

    Research interests

    Neurogenesis, Neural stem cells, Axon guidance, Neurodevelopment disorders and neurodegenerative diseases such as Microcephaly, Agenesis of corpus callosum, Amytrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Frontotemporal dementia (FTD), Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease.

  • Beth Jones

    Research Scientist in and Lecturer in Epidemiology (Chronic Diseases); Associate CEHE Director, Community Engagement; Director, Cancer Screening & Prevention Program

    Research Interests
    • Breast Neoplasms
    • Neoplasms
    • Social Class
    • Socioeconomic Factors
    • Epidemiologic Factors
    • Health Care Quality, Access, and Evaluation
    • Minority Health
    • Health Status Disparities
    • Healthcare Disparities
    • Social Determinants of Health
    • Health Care

    Dr. Jones is a cancer epidemiologist whose work and teaching focus is on health disparities. Her research is focused on racial/ethnic differences in cancer screening and cancer outcomes. Current work has focused on the Hispanic/Latino population with studies of predictors of mammography screening and other health behaviors, breast density, and colorectal cancer screening in Hispanic/Latinas living in the Northeast, US. Using a multidisciplinary approach, she has evaluated the role(s) of tumor characteristics, selected genetic alterations and genetic polymorphisms, as well as social class, medical care, and psychosocial factors, in explaining differences cancer stage at diagnosis and survival between African Americans and Whites in breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer. Other work has identified important African American/White differences in mammography screening and screening outcomes.

  • Erica C Leifheit

    Research Scientist in Epidemiology (Chronic Diseases)

    Research Interests
    • Cardiovascular Diseases
    • Quality of Health Care
    • Quality of Life
    • Stroke

    Erica Leifheit is a Research Scientist in the Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology at Yale School of Public Health. Her research interests are in psychosocial, cardiovascular, and cerebrovascular epidemiology and outcomes. Dr. Leifheit’s earlier work focused on the relationship of psychosocial factors, such as social support, depression, and stress, to patient-centered outcomes and adherence after acute myocardial infarction. Her current work centers on outcomes after stroke, using national healthcare claims data to better understand patterns in stroke care delivery and outcomes across hospitals and geographic regions. She is also involved in a number of projects that use Medicare administrative data to enhance the surveillance of patient outcomes for clinical trials and prospective registries. Dr. Leifheit received her PhD in epidemiology and public health from Yale University. 

  • Jessica Lewis

    Associate Research Scientist in Epidemiology (Chronic Diseases); Deputy Director, Center for Community Engagement and Health Equity, Yale Cancer Center; Board Member, Dean's Advisory Council for LGBTQI+ Affairs, Yale University; Co-Founder, Expect With Me, CDE

    Research Interests
    • Behavior and Behavior Mechanisms
    • Social Sciences
    • Health Care Quality, Access, and Evaluation
    • Health Status Disparities
    • Healthcare Disparities

    Jessica Lewis, Ph.D., MFT is an Associate Research Scientist at the Yale School of Public Health and Deputy Director for the Center for Community Engagement and Health Equity at the Yale Cancer Center. Additionally, Dr. Lewis is a licensed family therapist. Dr. Lewis has directed research projects on health behaviors, health equity, and women’s sexual, reproductive, and mental health at Yale for more than 24 years. Her research investigates the interplay of complex biomedical, behavioral, social, and structural factors that influence individual and family health. She uses this lens to examine challenges faced by those often marginalized by the health care system and by society. Dr. Lewis is co-founder of Expect With Me, a technology-enabled group model of prenatal care, which has been demonstrated to significantly improve maternal-child health outcomes. Dr. Lewis has extensive experience directing large multi-site research projects; promoting interdisciplinary team science; and engaging community stakeholders to improve public health. Dr. Lewis is interested in multi-level social determinants of health and wellness and bringing health innovations to scale through creative transdisciplinary, multi-sector partnerships. Dr. Lewis is an author of more than 60 peer-reviewed publications.

  • Lingeng Lu

    Research Scientist in Epidemiology (Chronic Diseases)

    Research Interests
    • Aging
    • Breast Neoplasms
    • HIV
    • Immunologic Factors
    • Insulin-Like Growth Factor II
    • Ovarian Neoplasms
    • Pancreatic Neoplasms
    • Polymorphism, Genetic
    • Helicobacter pylori
    • Endometrial Neoplasms
    • Molecular Epidemiology
    • Reproductive Medicine
    • DNA Methylation
    • Metabolic Syndrome
    • MicroRNAs
    • RNA, Long Noncoding

    Dr. Lu is currently a Research Scientist  in the Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology at the Yale School of Public Health. Dr. Lu’s research focuses on determining the role of genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors in the susceptibility and clinical outcome of chronic diseases, particularly human cancer (gynecologic and gastrointestinal cancer), metabolic syndrome, HIV/ADIS, mental and reproductive health. He is now leading the Molecular Cancer Epidemiology Laboratory and Shared Resource of the Yale Cancer Center and YSPH, and develops molecular biology tools and technologies, providing critical laboratory supports for studies by colleagues. His research also involves data mining, bioinformatics and pathway analyses, DNA/RNA secondary structure. Using next-generation small RNA-seq technologies, he recently explored the associations of miRNAs in circulating cell-secreted exosomes and HIV-associated neurological disorders. His research has addressed the prognostic and predictive values of genetic, epigenetic (non-coding RNAs and DNA methylation), growth factors and immunological factors in several human malignancies, and the effect of the biological and environmental factors on the risk of several chronic diseases.

  • Alysa Pomer

    Associate Research Scientist

    Research Interests
    • Disasters
    • Menarche
    • Vanuatu
    • Obesity
    • Rural Health
    • Global Health
    • Samoa
    • Reproductive Health

    Alysa Pomer is an Associate Research Scientist in the Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology in the Yale School of Public Health. Her research focuses on health in Pacific Island nations. She is particularly interested in adolescent and reproductive health during population health transition. Dr. Pomer's previous work has included research on secular trends in menarche and psychosocial stress after natural disasters. Her current research investigates the development of chronic disease in the Pacific Island nation of Samoa. Dr. Pomer earned her PhD in Biological Anthropology from Binghamton University, in Binghamton, NY.

  • Anna Rivara

    Associate Research Scientist in Epidemiology (Chronic Diseases)

    Research Interests
    • Diabetes Mellitus
    • Biological Evolution
    • Diseases
    • Anthropology, Education, Sociology and Social Phenomena
    • Health Care

    I am an evolutionary anthropologist that focuses on human biology, and the evolution of health and disease in modern populations. My research aims are to better understand how  immune and metabolic responses, in association with poverty and gendered pressures, construct non-communicable and infectious diseases in women, and perpetuate poor health outcomes. My background is in Applied Biological Anthropology, Public Health, and African Studies. Currently I work with Yale University's Olaga Research Lab in Samoa studying inflammation, non-communicable diseases, and physical activity. My previous work has taken me to Brazil to study the interactions between parasitism and reproductive health in women of the Kalunga quilombo, and to Tanzania to study the impact of HIV on children and family structures. 

  • Sakinah Carter Suttiratana

    Associate Research Scientist

    Research Interests
    • Early Detection of Cancer

    Dr. Suttiratana is a Sociologist of Health and Illness whose interests include various sociocultural influences on health. She currently serves as Coordinator for the Yale Cancer Disparities Firewall Project, a partnership between the Yale School of Public Health and the Yale Cancer Center. The project aims to improve prevention and screening behaviors among New Haven residents while building health promotion infrastructure to benefit local cancer prevention and control. Other research includes a study of diet and physical activity habit formation among transnational, immigrants from the Caribbean and using mixed methods to improve care and devices for youth with Type 1 diabetes mellitus and their families. 

    Dr. Suttiratana’s interests coalesce around considerations of social science insights to strengthen the reach and impact of public health messages and interventions. In this vein, she has contributed to various translational and community based research and implementation projects among diverse U.S. and international populations. Dr. Suttiratana has professional experience in epidemiological surveillance, community based, participatory research, clinic-based research, mixed methods design and analysis, intervention implementation, program evaluation and health leadership development in the U.S. and the Latin America and Caribbean region including work for the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the World Health Organization.

  • Yetsa Tuakli-Wosornu

    Associate Research Scientist in Epidemiology (Chronic Diseases)

    Yetsa A. Tuakli-Wosornu, MD, MPH is a board-certified physical medicine and rehabilitation (PM&R) physician, also known as a physiatrist. A physiatrist focuses on treating problems with the muscles, joints and nerves without surgery.

    Dr. Tuakli-Wosornu specializes in interventional spine and sports medicine treatments, helping people achieve high physical and athletic performance at all stages of life through “holistic mind-body development” and therapies. She approaches her work with a sense of compassion and innovation. Physiatry allows “my experiences as a physician, athlete and public health advocate to dovetail,” she says.

     As a PM&R specialist, she is skilled in such innovative treatments as image-guided joint and spine injections, as well as platelet-rich plasma (PRP), a cutting-edge therapy that helps many athletes heal from injuries faster and better. PRP uses a patient’s own blood and platelets, which contain growth factor proteins known to help tissue heal. The physiatrist injects the material directly into the site of injury in a procedure that can be easily performed in the office setting.

    When she works with patients, Dr. Tuakli-Wosornu often draws upon her personal experience as an athlete. She is a long jumper who represented the Ghana National Team until 2016. She also represents Ghana as part of the 8-member International Paralympic Committee medical committee.

     She has also done extensive community work and serves as the International Paralympic Committee’s inaugural welfare officer. She still treats people in her native West Africa, traveling home about twice per year. “There, preventive health remains underdeveloped, interventional spine care is absent, and the specialty of physiatry has yet to be developed,” says Dr. Tuakli-Wosornu, noting that she hopes to make an impact wherever she can.

  • Rong Wang

    Research Scientist

    Research Interests
    • Chronic Disease
    • Epidemiology
    • Neoplasms
    • Health Care

    Dr. Wang is a cancer epidemiologist who studies the health outcomes and etiology of different types of cancers, especially hematopoietic malignancies.  She is interested in the pattern of care, treatment and cost in older adults. She is also working on traffic exposure and genetic characteristics on the risk of cancer.

Secondary

  • Gail D'Onofrio

    Albert E. Kent Professor of Emergency Medicine and Professor of Epidemiology (Chronic Diseases); Chair, Department of Emergency Medicine

    Research Interests
    • Pharmaceutical Preparations
    • Chemicals and Drugs

    Dr. D’Onofrio is Professor and the Inaugural Chair of the Department of Emergency Medicine at the Yale School of Medicine (2009) and Physician-in Chief of Emergency Services at Yale-New Haven Hospital EDs with an annual census of approximately 180,000 patients. Dr. D'Onofrio is also Professor in the School of Public Health in the Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology.  She is also boarded in emergency and addiction medicine.  Dr. D’Onofrio has extensive experience as a leader, researcher, mentor and educator, and is internationally known for her work in alcohol and other substance use disorders (SUDs) as well as for her research on gender variations in women with ischemic heart disease.   Her work (JAMA, 2015) demonstrating that ED-initiated buprenorphine increases engagement in addiction treatment for individuals with OUD, has changed clinical practice, receiving multiple science awards, including awards from the Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation and the Clinical Research Forum.  Dr. D’Onofrio has a long track record of mentoring physician scientists in independent research careers. She is the PI of a NIDA K12 establishing the Yale Drug Use, Addiction and HIV Research Scholars (Yale-DAHRS) program, a Mentored Career Development Program with focused training in prevention and treatment of drug use, addiction, and HIV in general medical settings with scholars in Medicine, Emergency Medicine (EM), Pediatrics, Obstetrics and Gynecology, and Pulmonary Critical Care; and she has mentored numerous EM faculty.  She has received multiple awards including Excellence in Mentoring award from the Association for Medical Education and Research in Substance Abuse (AMERSA 2008), Advancing Women in Emergency Medicine award from the Society of Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM 2016) and the Academy for Women in Academic Emergency Medicine (AWAEM) Outstanding Department Award for the advancement of women (SAEM 2018). Dr. D’Onofrio is a founding Board member of the Board of Addiction Medicine recently recognized by ABMS as a Specialty, Sub-specialty.  An advocate for individuals with SUD, she is one of the architects of Connecticut Governor’s Strategic Plan to Reduce Opioid Deaths, working with multiple agencies regionally and nationally to change policies and introduce interventions to combat the opioid crisis.

  • Vincent DeVita

    Amy and Joseph Perella Professor of Medicine (Medical Oncology) and Professor of Epidemiology (Chronic Diseases)

    Research Interests
    • Hodgkin Disease
    • Lymphoma
    • Molecular Biology
    • Health Care

    Dr. Vincent DeVita, the Amy and Joseph Perella Professor of Medicine at the Yale Cancer Center and Professor of Epidemiology and of Public Health, was the Director of the Yale Cancer Center from 1993 to 2003. He spent the early part of his career at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), and in 1980, the President of the United States appointed him director of the NCI and the National Cancer Program, a position he held until 1988. From 1988 until be returned to Yale in 1993, he was Physician-in-Chief and Attending Physician at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and a member of the Program of Molecular Pharmacology. Dr. DeVita has earned international recognition for his accomplishments as a pioneer in the field of Oncology. While at the NCI, he developed combination chemotherapy programs curative for Hodgkin's disease and diffuse large cell lymphomas. He developed the four-drug combination, known by the acronym MOPP, which increased the cure rate for patients with advanced Hodgkin's disease from nearly zero to over 70%. In addition, in collaboration with Dr. George Canellos, he developed the combination chemotherapy CMF, which still remains a useful therapy for breast cancer. He earned his Bachelor of Science degree from the College of William and Mary in 1957. He was awarded his M.D. degree with distinction from the George Washington University School of Medicine in 1961. Dr. DeVita is the author or co-author of more than 450 scientific articles. He is one of the three editors of "Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology", in its 11th edition, and serves as the Editor-in-Chief of The Cancer Journal. Dr. DeVita, along with his daughter, Elizabeth DeVita-Raeburn wrote a personal memoir entitled "The Death of Cancer: After Fifty Years on the Front Lines of Medicine, a Pioneering Oncologist Reveals Why the War on cancer is Winnable--and How We Can Get There", published in 2015.

  • Evelyn Hsieh Donroe

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Rheumatology); Chief of Rheumatology, VA Connecticut Healthcare System; Assistant Professor of Epidemiology (Chronic Diseases)

    Research Interests
    • Education
    • Epidemiology
    • Musculoskeletal Diseases
    • Osteoporosis
    • Rheumatology
    • Global Health
    • Women's Health

    Dr. Hsieh is Assistant Professor of Medicine (Rheumatology) and Epidemiology (Chronic Diseases) at Yale, and Chief of Rheumatology for the VA Connecticut HealthCare System. She enjoys caring for patients and teaching on the medical wards of the West Haven VA Medical Center and Yale New Haven Hospital. 

    Dr. Hsieh has expertise in global health, with a specific focus on integrating biomedical and behavioral research methods to improve outcomes for rheumatic and musculoskeletal disease in countries in economic transition. The major emphasis of this body of research has focused on mechanisms, epidemiology, and prevention strategies for osteoporosis among individuals with HIV in China. The tools and models developed through this work have also translated to projects in other low-resource settings (osteoporosis, fracture and sarcopenia among women with HIV in Peru), and other models of secondary osteoporosis (breast cancer and rheumatoid arthritis). She also has a longstanding commitment to medical education and global health research training.

    Dr. Hsieh's research is supported by the International Research Scientist Development Award from the NIH/Fogarty International Center and the Rheumatology Research Foundation. She has also received support from the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, the Yale Center for Clinical Investigation/NIH National Center for the Advancing Translational Sciences, and the Doris Duke Foundation. 

    She is a co-founder of the Yale Network for Global Non-Communicable Diseases, and was honored to serve on the Board of Directors of the American College of Rheumatology from 2017-2020. She is the inaugural chair of the ACR Global Engagement Special Committee. 

  • Charles Fuchs

    Richard Sackler and Jonathan Sackler Professor of Medicine (Medical Oncology) and Professor of Chronic Disease Epidemiology; Director, Yale Cancer Center and Physician-in-Chief, Smilow Cancer Hospital

    Research Interests
    • Gastrointestinal Neoplasms
    • Biomarkers

    Charles S. Fuchs, MD, MPH, became Director of Yale Cancer Center and Physician-in-Chief of Smilow Cancer Hospital on January 1, 2017. An internationally recognized expert in gastrointestinal cancers and cancer epidemiology, Dr. Fuchs was previously professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and chief of the gastrointestinal oncology division and the Robert T. and Judith B. Hale Chair in Pancreatic Cancer at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. View a profile video with Dr. Fuchs>>

    Dr. Fuchs received his medical degree from Harvard Medical School in 1986. He completed his medical residency at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, where he also served as chief medical resident, and completed his medical oncology fellowship at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. In 1994, he received his M.P.H. from Harvard School of Public Health. He serves on the Board of Directors for CytomX Therapeutics.

  • Thomas M. Gill

    Humana Foundation Professor of Medicine (Geriatrics) and Professor of Epidemiology (Chronic Diseases) and of Investigative Medicine; Director, Yale Program on Aging; Director, Claude D. Pepper Older Americans Independence Center; Director, Yale Center for Disability and Disabling Disorders; Director, Yale Training Program in Geriatric Clinical Epidemiology and Aging-Related Research

    Research Interests
    • Aging
    • Disability Evaluation
    • Epidemiology
    • Geriatrics
    • Geriatric Assessment
    • Clinical Trial

    Dr. Thomas Gill is Professor of Medicine, Epidemiology, and Investigative Medicine and the Humana Foundation Professor of Geriatric Medicine at Yale University. He received his research training in clinical epidemiology as a Robert Wood Johnson (RWJ) Clinical Scholar at Yale, and he joined the faculty in 1994 after completing an additional year as a geriatrics fellow. Dr. Gill is a leading authority on the epidemiology and prevention of disability among older persons and is the recipient of numerous awards, including the Paul Beeson Physician Faculty Scholars in Aging Research Award, the RWJ Generalist Physician Faculty Scholar Award, the 2001 Outstanding Scientific Achievement for Clinical Investigation Award from the American Geriatrics Society, the Ewald W. Busse Research Award in the Biomedical Sciences, and the 2012 Joseph T. Freeman Award from the Gerontological Society of America. Dr. Gill holds several leadership positions at Yale, including Director of the Program on Aging and Claude D. Pepper Older Americans Independence Center, Director of the Center on Disability and Disabling Disorders, and Director of an NIA-funded postdoctoral training program in Geriatric Clinical Epidemiology and Aging-Related Research. His research accomplishments have been recognized through receipt of a MERIT Award from the National Institutes of Health and election to the American Society of Clinical Investigation and Association of American Physicians.

  • Cary Gross

    Professor of Medicine (General Medicine) and of Epidemiology (Chronic Diseases); Founder and Director, Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy and Effectiveness Research (COPPER) Center, Yale School of Medicine; Director, Adult Primary Care Center, Quality Improvement; Chair, National Clinician Scholars Program; Director, National Clinician Scholars Program

    Research Interests
    • Chronic Disease
    • Epidemiology
    • Health Policy
    • Internal Medicine
    • Ethics, Research

    Dr. Cary Gross is a Professor of Medicine, and Director of the National Clinician Scholars Program at Yale. Dr. Gross completed his residency in Internal Medicine at New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center and served as chief medical resident at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center the following year. His research addresses comparative effectiveness, quality, and population health, with a focus on cancer prevention and treatment. He is a founding Director of Yale’s Cancer Outcomes Public Policy and Effectiveness Research Center (COPPER). His research has been supported by the National Cancer Institute, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, and the American Cancer Society, among others. As a former Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholar, Dr. Gross has advanced training in biostatistics, epidemiology, research ethics, and outcomes research. Follow him on twitter: @cpgYale

  • Morgan Levine

    Assistant Professor of Pathology and Epidemiology (Chronic Diseases)

    Research Interests
    • Aging
    • Algorithms
    • Alzheimer Disease
    • Energy Intake
    • Longevity
    • Stem Cells
    • Genetic Variation
    • Cellular Senescence
    • DNA Methylation
    • Computational Biology
    • Gene Expression Profiling
    • Gene Regulatory Networks
    • Biostatistics
    • Clonal Evolution

    Morgan Levine is a ladder-rank Assistant Professor in the Department of Pathology at the Yale School of Medicine and a member of both the Yale Combined Program in Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, and the Yale Center for Research on Aging. Her work relies on an interdisciplinary approach, integrating theories and methods from statistical genetics, computational biology, and mathematical demography to develop biomarkers of aging for humans and animal models using high-dimensional omics data. As PI or co-Investigator on multiple NIH-, Foundation-, and University-funded projects, she has extensive experience using systems-level and machine learning approaches to track epigenetic, transcriptomic, and proteomic changes with aging and incorporate this information to develop measures of risk stratification for major chronic diseases, such as cancer and Alzheimer’s disease. Her work also involves development of systems-level outcome measures of aging, aimed at facilitating evaluation for geroprotective interventions. A number of the existing biological aging measures she has developed are being applied in both basic and observational research.

  • Marcella Nunez-Smith

    Associate Dean for Health Equity Research and Associate Professor of Internal Medicine (General Medicine), of Epidemiology (Chronic Disease) and of Public Health (Social And Behavioral Sciences); Associate Dean, Health Equity Research; Founding Director, Equity Research and Innovation Center (ERIC), Yale School of Medicine; Director, Center for Research Engagement (CRE); Director, Center for Community Engagement and Health Equity; Deputy Director for Health Equity Research and Workforce Development, Yale Center for Clinical Investigation (YCCI); Director, Pozen-Commonwealth Fund Fellowship in Health Equity Leadership

    Research Interests
    • Chronic Disease
    • Health Services Research
    • Internal Medicine
    • Social Justice
    • Socioeconomic Factors
    • Global Health
    • Women's Health
    • Caribbean Region
    • Vulnerable Populations
    • Minority Health
    • Healthcare Disparities
    • Community-Based Participatory Research
    • Social Discrimination
    • Social Determinants of Health
    • Patient Reported Outcome Measures
    • Global Burden of Disease
    • Population Health
    • COVID-19

    Dr. Nunez-Smith is Associate Professor of Internal Medicine, Public Health, and Management; Inaugural Associate Dean for Health Equity Research; Founding Director of the Equity Research and Innovation Center (ERIC); Director of the Center for Research Engagement (CRE); Associate Cancer Center Director for Community Outreach and Engagement at Yale Cancer Center; Chief Health Equity Officer at Smilow Cancer Hospital; Deputy Director for Health Equity Research and Workforce Development at the Yale Center for Clinical Investigation; Core Faculty in the National Clinician Scholars Program; Research Faculty in the Global Health Leadership Initiative; Director of the Pozen-Commonwealth Fund Fellowship in Health Equity Leadership; and Co-Director of the Doris Duke Clinical Research Fellowship.

    Dr. Nunez-Smith’s research focuses on promoting health and healthcare equity for structurally marginalized populations with an emphasis on centering community engagement, supporting healthcare workforce diversity and development, developing patient reported measurements of healthcare quality, and identifying regional strategies to reduce the global burden of non-communicable diseases. Dr. Nunez-Smith has extensive expertise in examining the effects of social and structural determinants of health, systemic influences contributing to health disparities, health equity improvement, and community-academic partnered scholarship. In addition to this extensive experience in primary data collection, management, and analysis, ERIC has institutional expertise in qualitative and mixed methods, population health, and medical informatics.

    She is the principal investigator on many NIH and foundation-funded research projects, including an NIH/NCI-funded project to develop a tool to assess patient reported experiences of discrimination in healthcare. She has conducted an investigation of the promotion and retention of diversity in academic medical school faculty and has published numerous articles on the experiences of minority students and faculty. Funded by NIH/NIMHD, she established the Eastern Caribbean Health Outcomes Research Network (ECHORN), a research collaborative across four Eastern Caribbean islands, supporting several chronic disease research projects and enhancing health outcomes research and leadership capacity in the region; the flagship ECHORN Cohort Study recruited and is following a community-dwelling adult cohort (n=3000) to examine novel chronic disease risk and protective factors. She recently received NIH/NHLBI funding to build upon this work by recruiting children into an expanded intergenerational ECHORN cohort, inclusive of a biorepository. She is also PI on one of five NIH/NIMHD-funded Transdisciplinary Collaborative Centers on Health Disparities focused on Precision Medicine, which leverages the ECHORN infrastructure to conduct collaborative research on hypertension and diabetes. 

    Most recently, as the COVID-19 pandemic has shed national attention on the health and healthcare disparities of marginalized populations, she was called upon to serve on the Governor’s ReOpen CT Advisory Group and to chair its Community Committee. She served as an Advisor to the Biden-Harris campaign, and subsequently named co-chair of the Biden-Harris Transition COVID-19 Advisory Board and will serve as chair of the COVID-19 Health Equity Task Force in the administration. She also received NIH funding to leverage ECHORN to improve the COVID-19 testing cascade in Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands.

    Dr. Nunez-Smith has mentored dozens of trainees since completing fellowship and has received numerous awards for teaching and mentoring. She is board certified in internal medicine, having completed residency training at Harvard University’s Brigham and Women’s Hospital and fellowship at the Yale Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholars Program, where she also received a Masters in Health Sciences. Originally from the US Virgin Islands, she attended Jefferson Medical College, where she was inducted into the Alpha Omega Alpha Medical Honor Society, and she earned a BA in Biological Anthropology and Psychology at Swarthmore College. 

  • Brita Roy

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (General Medicine) and Epidemiology (Chronic Diseases); Director of Population Health (Yale Medicine), N/A

    Research Interests
    • Preventive Medicine
    • Social Justice

    Brita Roy, MD, MPH, MHS is Assistant Professor of Medicine at the Yale School of Medicine (General Medicine) and Assistant Professor of Epidemiology at the Yale School of Public Health (Chronic Diseases), and Director of Population Health for Yale Medicine.

    Dr. Roy is a clinician-investigator, researching ways to use assets-based approaches to mitigating disparities in health outcomes by identifying and promoting positive psychosocial factors at the individual and community levels. She is investigating mechanisms by which positive psychology can prevent disease among individuals and groups, which led to the development of an actionable framework to measure and support the health and well-being of entire communities. She also serves as a measurement lead for the 100 Million Healthier Lives initiative, led by the Institute for Healthcare Improvement. In addition, Dr. Roy also enjoys teaching health professions students and internal medicine residents in the classroom and while taking care of a diverse array of patients in the hospital.

    Dr. Roy pursued Bachelors and Master’s degrees in Biomedical Engineering at Vanderbilt University and Wayne State University, respectively. She then went on to the University of Michigan to pursue a combined MD/MPH in Health Behavior and Health Education. Dr. Roy subsequently completed residency training in internal medicine and served as Chief Medical Resident at the University of Alabama at Birmingham prior to completing the Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars Program at Yale University.

  • Peter Salovey

    President and Chris Argyris Professor of Psychology; President of the University

    Research Interests
    • Behavior and Behavior Mechanisms
    • Emotions
    • Psychological Phenomena
    • Psychology, Applied
    • Psychology, Social
    • Health Behavior
    • Risk Reduction Behavior
    • Emotional Intelligence
    • Health Communication
    • Psychiatry and Psychology

    Peter Salovey is the twenty-third president of Yale University and the Chris Argyris Professor of Psychology. He holds secondary faculty appointments in the School of Management, the School of Public Health, the Institution for Social and Policy Studies, and the Sociology Department. He became president of the university in July 2013. 

    President Salovey has led the development of new programs and facilities across the schools and departments of Yale, including restructuring the leadership of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences and opening two new residential colleges, expanding Yale College enrollment by 15 percent. He is advancing innovative teaching on campus; amplifying Yale’s partnerships in Africa, Asia, and other parts of the world; and enhancing multidisciplinary collaboration and entrepreneurial opportunity for faculty and students. President Salovey is committed to increasing access to a Yale education for students worldwide regardless of their financial background. 

    Prior to becoming president, President Salovey served as the provost of Yale University from 2008 to 2013. As provost, he facilitated strategic planning and initiatives such as enhancing career development and mentoring opportunities for all Yale faculty members; promoting faculty diversity; creating the Office of Academic Integrity; establishing the University-wide Committee on Sexual Misconduct; developing the West Campus; and overseeing the university’s budget during the global financial crisis.

    Other leadership roles at Yale have included serving as chair of the Department of Psychology (2000 to 2003); dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (2003 to 2004); and dean of Yale College (2004 to 2008).

    After receiving an A.B. (psychology) and A.M. (sociology) from Stanford University in 1980 with departmental honors and university distinction, President Salovey earned three degrees at Yale in psychology: M.S. (1983), M.Phil. (1984), and Ph.D. (1986). Since joining the Yale faculty in 1986, he has studied the connections among emotion, health communication, and health behavior, with a special focus on emotional intelligence, in collaboration with Jack Mayer. He played key roles in multiple Yale programs including the Health, Emotion, and Behavior Laboratory, which President Salovey founded and is now the Center for Emotional Intelligence; the Center for Interdisciplinary Research on AIDS; and the Cancer Prevention and Control Research Program. 

    President Salovey has authored or edited over a dozen books translated into eleven languages and published hundreds of journal articles and essays. In addition to teaching and mentoring scores of graduate students, President Salovey has won both the William Clyde DeVane Medal for Distinguished Scholarship and Teaching in Yale College and the Lex Hixon ’63 Prize for Teaching Excellence in the Social Sciences. He has received honorary degrees from the University of Pretoria (2009), Shanghai Jiao Tong University (2014), National Tsing Hua University (2014), Harvard University (2015), McGill University (2018), University of Haifa (2018), and Vytautas Magnus University (2019). In 2013, he was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and to the National Academy of Medicine.

    To read his full biography, please visit http://president.yale.edu/about-president-salovey.

  • Jeremy I. Schwartz

    Associate Professor; Co-Director, Uganda Initiative for Integrated Management of Non-Communicable Diseases; Firm Chief, Yale Primary Care Residency Program, General Internal Medicine; Medical Director, Eastern Caribbean Health Outcomes Research Network, General Internal Medicine; Lead, Faculty Network Development, Yale Institute for Global Health

    Research Interests
    • Africa, Eastern
    • Chronic Disease
    • Quality of Health Care
    • Uganda
    • Global Health
    • Interdisciplinary Communication
    • Quality Improvement

    Dr. Schwartz is an Associate Professor of Medicine (General Medicine) at Yale School of Medicine and of Epidemiology (Chronic Diseases) at Yale School of Public Health. He is board-certified in both Internal Medicine and Pediatrics. Dr. Schwartz is a Firm Chief on the general medicine inpatient teaching service at Yale New Haven Hospital Saint Raphael Campus, overseeing patient care and teaching activities on Verdi 5 North. He places an emphasis on patient quality and safety and the patient experience and engages in research in those realms. He directs a large quality improvement project aiming to improve patient care, patient-centered communication, and inter-professional engagement in the inpatient setting.

    Globally, his focus centers around non-communicable diseases (NCDs). He is an active member of the global NCD advocacy movement. He serves on the Advisory Council of the Young Professionals Chronic Disease Network and is a member of the East African NCD Alliance post-2015 Implementation Initiative. His research focuses on improving integrated health service delivery for NCDs in Uganda. He is a co-founder, and the US-based co-Director, of the Uganda Initiative for the Integrated Management of Non-Communicable Diseases (UINCD). This multi-sectoral collaboration brings together leaders from the Ugandan Ministry of Health, academia (Yale School of Medicine and Makerere University College of Health Sciences), civil society organizations, and the health system to address the often fragmented nature of NCD service delivery and training.

    Dr. Schwartz is Medical Director of the Eastern Caribbean Health Outcomes Research Network (ECHORN), a large cohort study of non-communicable diseases (PI: Dr. Marcella Nunez-Smith), based at the Yale Equity Research and Innovation Center (ERIC). Dr. Schwartz has been directing "Topics in Global Medicine" (formerly the Tropical Medicine Course) since 2010. This interdisciplinary elective course for health professions students at Yale presents a wide range of globally relevant health issues in an interactive format.

Voluntary & Adjunct

  • Anne Marie Jukic
    Research Interests
    • Infertility, Female
    • Pregnancy
    • Reproduction
    • Vitamin D

    Dr. Anne Marie Jukic is a perinatal epidemiologist whose research spans the perinatal period, from pre-conception, to pregnancy, to pregnancy outcomes and child health. She is interested in early pregnancy, particularly implantation and early placental development, and the relevance of these events for pregnancy health or child health. Her current research focuses on the role of vitamin D in reproduction, and she has published the first papers describing a link between vitamin D and menstrual cycle function in community-based samples of women. Her other work includes investigating environmental exposures (such as phthalates and phenols), other nutritional exposures, and physical activity. After completing a Bachelor's degree at the University of Notre Dame she joined the Peace Corps where she developed an interest in public health. During her graduate work at Emory University she trained at the Centers for Disease Control in the Safe Motherhood Branch. She continued her graduate studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill where she completed her doctoral dissertation examining physical activity during pregnancy and pregnancy outcomes. She completed a post-doctoral fellowship at the National Institute for Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS).

  • Byron Kennedy

    Associate Clinical Professor, Chronic Disease Epidemiology

    Byron Kennedy, '01 M.P.H., '04 M.D., '04 Ph.D., Connecticut Department of Corrections, Medical Director.  Dr. Kennedy is Board Certified in Preventive Medicine and has broad expertise in community-based approaches aimed at improving the health of vulnerable patient populations. While providing leadership within a local public health agency, he has worked collaboratively with multiple stakeholder groups from the public, private and nonprofit sectors to promote health and wellness. He has expertise in advising elected leaders at the state and local levels on health policies. He has given a number of lectures/presentations to students, medical professionals, community groups, and policy makers. In addition, he has practiced in urgent care, occupational medicine, and general practice clinics, including both pediatric and adult patients. Finally, Dr. Kennedy has published papers in the areas of health disparities, chronic disease treatment, tobacco control, repetitive-use injury, and communicable disease outbreaks.

  • Rock G. Positano

    Associate Clinical Professor, Chronic Disease Epidemiology

    Dr. Rock G. Positano is the Founder and Director of the Non-Surgical Foot and Ankle Service and Joe DiMaggio Sports Medicine Center at the Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) and New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical College in New York City, where he has been on staff since 1991. 

    He is internationally known for his non-surgical approach for the treatment of foot and ankle disorders and developing treatment protocols that prevent the progression of foot and ankle deformities using conservative treatment regimens such as prescription foot orthoses and physical therapy modalities. Most often these non-surgical regimens prevent the need for surgical intervention in the active patient.

    In addition, Dr. Positano's Center at Hospital for Special Surgery in New York City also focuses on the effect that abnormal foot function has on the development of knee, hip and lower back disorders in the active and athletic population.

    Dr. Positano was featured on the front page of the New York Times in an article concerning the dangers of cosmetic foot surgery. He has authored and edited numerous peer reviewed articles and has served as the editor of 11 orthopedic/medical/podiatric textbooks ranging from non- surgical foot and ankle orthopedics, heel disorders, sports medicine, foot and ankle disorder prevention and systemic disease manifestations in the foot, ankle and lower extremity.

  • Douglas Shenson

    Associate Clinical Professor; Associate Professor Adjunct, Department of Medicine, General Medicine Section

    Research Interests
    • Humanities
    • Diseases
    • Anthropology, Education, Sociology and Social Phenomena
    • Health Care

    Dr. Shenson is Associate Professor Adjunct, Yale School of Medicine, and Associate Clinical Professor, Yale School of Public Health. He is also Associate Director, Clinical Preventive Services, at the Yale-Griffin Prevention Research Center. Dr. Shenson directs Sickness Prevention Achieved through Regional Collaboration (SPARC), a nonprofit agency dedicated to expanding the population-wide use of disease prevention services. As part of his work at SPARC, Dr. Shenson leads the Vote & Vax program, which is developing and testing a national strategy to provide influenza vaccinations at polling places. Dr. Shenson has led numerous research projects funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to better characterize the provision of vaccinations and cancer screening to older Americans. He is a co-founder of the medical humanitarian organization, Doctors of the World USA (now HealthRight International), and founder of the Human Rights Clinic at Montefiore Medical Center, the first clinic in New York City to attend exclusively to the documentation and service needs of survivors of torture. He is a board member of the International Association for Indigenous Aging (IA2), which focuses on health issues of concern to elder American Indians. Between 2007 and 2016, Dr. Shenson was Course Director of Principles of Epidemiology and Public Health, at Yale School of Medicine (YSM). He currently directs the required Epidemiology, Public Health & Biostatistics Thread, which runs throughout the 18-month YSM pre-clinical curriculum, and he co-leads the YSM/YU Colloquium in History of Medicine and Public Health.

  • Archana Shrestha

    Assistant Professor Adjunct

    Archana Shrestha is an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Chronic Diseases Epidemiology at Yale School of Public Health.

  • Rachel Stolzenberg-Solomon

    Dr. Stolzenberg-Solomon is a Senior Investigator in the Metabolic Epidemiology Branch in the Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics at the National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health. Dr. Stolzenberg-Solomon received a B.S. in nutrition and dietetics at the University of California, Davis in 1984, followed by a dietetic internship and M.Ed. in health science (nutrition) education at Vanderbilt University Medical Center and George Peabody School of Education, respectively. After this training, she worked as a registered dietitian for several years. In 1994, she completed a M.P.H. with concentrations in epidemiology and nutrition at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Dr. Stolzenberg-Solomon joined the National Cancer Institute in 1996 as a predoctoral fellow in the Cancer Prevention Studies Branch in the in the former Division of Cancer Prevention and Control and later the Center for Cancer Research, and subsequently earned a Ph.D. in epidemiology from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in 1999. As a Cancer Prevention Fellow, she continued postdoctoral research in the Division of Cancer Prevention and Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics. She became an investigator in the Nutritional Epidemiology Branch in December 2002, and was awarded NIH scientific tenure and promoted to Senior Investigator in 2011.

    Dr. Stolzenberg-Solomon has won several awards in recognition of her contributions to cancer research, including the 2008 NIH Merit Award for sustained and innovative work in elucidating nutritional, genetic, infectious, and other determinants of pancreatic cancer. She is an active mentor, working with graduate students, as well as postdoctoral fellows. She serves on the editorial board of the American Journal of Epidemiology and Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers, and Prevention. Dr. Stolzenberg-Solomon also holds a position as an adjunct Associate Professor at the Yale University School of Public Health, is a fellow of the American College of Epidemiology, and a member of the American Society of Epidemiology.

  • Kimberly Yonkers

    Professor Adjunct of Psychiatry

    Research Interests
    • Anxiety Disorders
    • Health Care Quality, Access, and Evaluation
    • Mood Disorders
    • Substance-Related Disorders
    • Sexual and Gender Disorders

    I am a Professor in the Departments of Psychiatry, Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences and in the School of Public Health .  My clinical position is Chief for the Yale New Haven Health Division of Psychological Medicine.  This Division provides inpatient and outpatient consultations to providers and patients in the other medical and surgical divisions of Yale New Haven Health.  Our services are provided at both the York Street and St. Raphael campuses. 

    My research hats include and being Director of Research for the Yale New Haven Hospital Division of the Department of Psychiatry and Director of the Center for Women and Mothers, a research unit in the Department of Psychiatry.  My group investigates the clinical course, etiopathology and treatment of psychiatric and substance use disorders as they occur in women. A major component of this work is the occurrence and treatment of illnesses in pregnancy and the postpartum period, and across the menstrual cycle. This area, by its nature, cuts across disciplines and requires psychiatric expertise, as well as knowledge in neuroscience and reproductive biology. Contributions to the literature include evaluations of the impact of psychiatric conditions and treatments on various birth outcomes.  My group published pivotal work in postpartum depression including the fact that 50% of instances of postpartum depression began antenatally and that standard antidepressant treatment is effective for postpartum onset of major depressive episodes.  My work on premenstrual dysphoric disorder, the severe form of premenstrual syndrome, established the efficacy of serotonin reuptake inhibitors as first line treatments.  Moreover, my work showed that treatment with these agents could commence either halfway through the menstrual cycle or at symptom onset. My recent work has explored the impact and treatment of substance use disorders on pregnancy and pregnancy outcomes.  We devised a screening measure for substance use in pregnancy, the Substance Use Risk Profile-Pregnancy, which is an efficient measure to help identify and assist pregnant women with substance misuse. Additional work in this arena includes finding a therapeutic effect on abstinence of progesterone for women who have postpartum cocaine use, and showing the efficacy of a computerized brief interview, based upon motivational principles, in reducing substance misuse in pregnant and non-pregnant women.

    I led the DSM 5  Study Group for Race, Gender and Ethnicity.  This group assessed psychiatric conditions to determine possible bias in race, gender and ethnicity and incorporated relative text about race, gender and ethnicity into the DSM 5 text.  I currently lead the Gender Study Group that is reviewing and conducting text revisions for the DSM 5 Text Revision.

    I am the inaugural Editor in Chief for a new American Psychiatric Association on-line journal, Psychiatric Research and Clinical Practice. This journal seeks to publish clinical and translational research as well as timely reviews in psychiatry.




  • Herbert Yu
    Research Interests
    • Breast Neoplasms
    • Liver Neoplasms
    • Neoplasms
    • Ovarian Neoplasms
    • Uterine Neoplasms
    • Molecular Epidemiology
    • Gene-Environment Interaction

    Dr. Yu is adjunct professor at Yale School of Public Health, Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, and a molecular epidemiologist with training in medicine, epidemiology, and clinical biochemistry. Dr. Yu has been involved in cancer research for over 20 years, and has had extensive experience in population-based epidemiologic investigation and patient-based clinical studies. Dr. Yu has conducted numerous epidemiologic and clinical research projects, addressing various issues in cancer research, from etiology to detection, and prognosis to treatment. Dr. Yu is especially experienced in laboratory-based molecular epidemiologic studies, and his research interests include gene-environment interaction in cancer development and progression and lifestyle's impact on epigenetic regulation. Dr. Yu has served on numerous national and international grant review committees, and has been involved in the design, execution and analysis of many epidemiological and clinical studies.

Lecturers

  • Lecturer

    Dr. Bortnichak is global head of the Pharmacoepidemiology and Database Research unit at Merck & Co., Inc. His career in the pharmaceutical industry spans 20 years. Immediately prior to joining Merck, Ed was Vice President, Scientific and Medical Healthcare Relations for Astra Zeneca and, prior to that Scientific Affairs role, he served as the Executive Director of Quantitative Decision Sciences for Astra Zeneca, U.S. Clinical Development. He has also held leadership positions managing Research Integration, Statistics, Epidemiology, Drug Safety and Outcomes Research Departments for Sanofi-Synthelabo, Ciba-Geigy, Berlex Laboratories, Pfizer and Ingenix. Prior to his industry career, he co-directed a community heart health behavior change program in Rhode Island and held a faculty post at Brown University

    Ed did his undergraduate studies at the University of Pennsylvania. He holds a Ph.D. in chronic disease epidemiology from the Yale University Graduate School and a Masters of Public Health (M.P.H.) from the Yale University School of Medicine. His post-doctoral work (also at Yale) was in advanced statistical methods, and he currently holds a faculty position as a lecturer in Epidemiology at Yale. 

  • Amy Darefsky

    Lecturer in Epidemiology (Chronic Diseases)

    Dr. Darefsky received her MPH in biostatistics and PhD in epidemiology from Yale University. She has taught a core epidemiology course and lectured on statistical multivariable survival analyses. Her research has focused primarily on adult brain cancer, including the descriptive epidemiology of glioma, risk factors for glioma incidence and glioblastoma multiforme survival. In addition, she has current research interests in the areas of climate change and health and environmental justice. 

  • Linda Degutis

    Lecturer

    Research Interests
    • Alcoholic Intoxication
    • Disaster Planning
    • Emergency Medicine
    • Epidemiology
    • Mental Health
    • Public Health
    • Bioethical Issues
    • Mass Casualty Incidents

    Dr. Degutis, a native of Chicago, received her Bachelor of Science degree from DePaul University, and her MSN and DrPH from Yale University. She is currently Executive Director of Defense Health Horizons, a program of the Henry M. Jackson Foundation for the Advancement of Military Medicine, that is based at the Uniformed Services University. In addition, she is the Chief Science Officer for The Avielle Foundation, and is a consultant in violence and injury prevention. Currently, she serves on the Board of the Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation (PIRE), the Society for the Advancement of Violence and Injury Research, and the Advisory Board of the College of Science and Health of DePaul University. Prior to this, she was the Director of the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control at the CDC. At Yale, she was Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine and Public Health and was the Director and Co-PI of the Yale Center for Public Health Preparedness, which designed and implemented education in disaster preparedness, response and recovery. She served as a Robert Wood Johnson Health Policy Fellow in the Office of the late Senator Paul Wellstone (D-MN). She is a Past President of the American Public Health Association (APHA), the oldest and largest public health association in the world. Dr. Degutis, a member of the National Academy of Medicine, has received the Distinguished Career and Public Service Awards from the Injury Control and Emergency Health Services Section of APHA, and was named an Honorary Fellow of the Royal Society for Public Health. Her work has focused on public health, injury and violence, substance abuse and policy, as well as disaster preparedness and mitigation. 

  • Debbie Humphries

    Instructor of Public Health Practice (Chronic Diseases)

    Research Interests
    • Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
    • Developing Countries
    • Ghana
    • HIV
    • Hookworm Infections
    • Malaria
    • Parasitology
    • Public Health
    • Vietnam
    • Global Health
    • Nutrition Policy

    Dr. Humphries has a broad background in public health research and practice. She has been a consultant in the areas of diet and physical activity behavior change, sustainability of community health programs, program monitoring and evaluation, and training in participatory monitoring and evaluation for organizations in Vietnam, Africa and in the United States. She has extended that reach through her Community Health Program Planning course which places student groups with agencies in the State of Connecticut to plan and evaluate programs. Sample projects include: Determining the Best Time to Implement Routine HIV Testing in Jails; Barriers to Accessing Health Care and Health Needs of Undocumented Immigrants; Evaluation of HIV/AIDS prevention, testing and care in Connecticut Correctional Facilities; and Strategies to Reduce Low Birth Weight in New Haven: An Evaluation of the Outreach Strategy of the New Haven Maternal and Child Health Department. Humphries is also a member of the Community Research Engagement steering committee at Yale.

    Dr. Humphries’ research addresses interactions between nutrition and infectious disease, as well as programmatic approaches to improving public health. This work has taken her to Asia and Africa where she has studied environmental factors and intestinal helminth infections and their relationship to anemia as well as effectiveness of intervention programs. She is currently collaborating on a longitudinal study to characterize parasite and host factors affecting response to deworming in Ghana.