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Saad B. Omer

MBBS, MPH, PhD, FIDSA
Director, Yale Institute for Global Health; Associate Dean (Global Health Research), Yale School of Medicine; Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases), Yale School of Medicine; Susan Dwight Bliss Professor of Epidemiology of Microbial Diseases, Yale School of Public Health

Contact Information

Saad B. Omer, MBBS, MPH, PhD, FIDSA
Saad B. Omer
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Appointments

Biography

Dr. Omer has conducted studies in the United States, Guatemala, Kenya, Uganda, Ethiopia, India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, South Africa, and Australia. Dr Omer’s research portfolio includes clinical trials to estimate efficacy of maternal and/or infant influenza, pertussis, polio, measles and pneumococcal vaccines and trials to evaluate drug regimens to reduce mother-to-child transmission of HIV. Moreover, he has conducted several studies on interventions to increase immunization coverage and acceptance. Dr Omer’s work has been cited in global and country-specific policy recommendations and has informed clinical practice and health legislation in several countries. He has directly mentored over 100 junior faculty, clinical and research post-doctoral fellows, and PhD and other graduate students.Dr. Omer has published widely in peer reviewed journals including the New England Journal of Medicine, JAMA, Lancet, British Medical Journal, Pediatrics, American Journal of Public Health, and Science and is the author of op-eds for publications such as the New York Times, Politico, and the Washington Post. 

Dr Omer has received multiple awards –including the Maurice Hilleman Award by the National Foundation of Infectious Diseases for his work on the impact of maternal influenza immunization on respiratory illness in infants younger than 6 months-for whom there is no vaccine. He has served on several advisory panels including the U.S. National Vaccine Advisory Committee, Presidential Advisory Council on Combating Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria -Vaccine Innovation Working Group, and WHO Expert Advisory Group for Healthcare Worker Vaccination. Moreover, he served as an academic affiliate of the Office of Evaluation Sciences –formerly known as the White House Social and Behavioral Sciences Team. Dr Omer has received multiple awards –including the Maurice Hilleman Award by the National Foundation of Infectious Diseases for his work on the impact of maternal influenza immunization on respiratory illness in infants younger than 6 months-for whom there is no vaccine. He has served on several advisory panels including the U.S. National Vaccine Advisory Committee, Presidential Advisory Council on Combating Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria -Vaccine Innovation Working Group, and WHO Expert Advisory Group for Healthcare Worker Vaccination. He has also served as an academic affiliate of the Office of Evaluation Sciences –formerly known as the White House Social and Behavioral Sciences Team.

Education & Training

  • PhD
    Johns Hopkins University (2007)
  • MPH
    Johns Hopkins University (2003)
  • MBBS
    The Aga Khan University Medical College (1998)

Activities

  • Increasing Vaccine Uptake Among Veterans at the Atlanta VA Health Care System
    Atlanta, United States (2018-2019)
    The Office of Evaluation Sciences is collaborating with Emory University and the Atlanta VA Health Care System to increase adult immunizations uptake among veterans. The intervention targets patients of primary care providers (physicians, physician assistants and nurse practitioners) through a modification of the existing reminders in the VA electronic health record system. The team will evaluate the intervention using a randomized controlled trial.
  • ccine Acceptance in Pregnant Minority Women
    Atlanta, United States (2012-2014)
    The purpose of study will be to test two vaccine education strategies to learn how they impact flu and pertussis (Tdap) vaccination rates and attitudes regarding vaccination during pregnancy after participating in the intervention. The education strategies will be based on the elaboration likelihood model (ELM). This model is based on experimental psychology and has been previously used to increase breast cancer screening rates. These education strategies will be delivered through routine prenatal care visits to black/African-American women in Atlanta.

Departments & Organizations