Our Faculty

  • A David Paltiel

    Professor of Public Health (Health Policy), Professor of Management, and Professor in the Institution for Social and Policy Studies; Co-director, Public Health Modeling Concentration

    The objective that guides Dr. Paltiel's scholarly activities is to promote a reasoned approach to decision making and resource allocation in public health and medicine. Trained in the field of Operations Research, Dr. Paltiel designs and implements policy models and cost-effectiveness analyses. He has a special interest and expertise in HIV/AIDS and has published broadly on the cost-effectiveness of testing, prevention, treatment, and care, both in the United States and around the world.

  • Ted Cohen

    Associate Professor of Epidemiology (Microbial Diseases) and Associate Professor in the Institution for Social and Policy Studies; Co-director, Public Health Modeling Concentration

    Dr. Cohen is an infectious disease epidemiologist with a primary research focus on tuberculosis. He is particularly interested in understanding how TB drug-resistance and medical comorbidities such as HIV frustrate current efforts to control epidemics, with an ultimate goal of developing more effective approaches to limit the morbidity caused by this pathogen. Dr. Cohen's training is in epidemiology and clinical medicine, and his work includes mathematical modeling, fieldwork, and analysis of programmatic data. His research program is currently funded by NIH, US CDC, and Gates Foundation Awards.

  • Saed Alizamir

    Associate Professor of Operations Management

    Professor Alizamir’s research interests lie in the areas of social responsibility and sustainability as well as healthcare operations. His research is mainly focused on public policy-related problems in these settings that involve dynamic decision-making and learning. In studying private-public interactions, he incorporates operational elements into his analytical models and applies various tools from operations research and game theory. The goal of his research is to provide normative recommendations that can inform better policy decisions, especially in areas where not enough data exists to run full-fledged empirical studies. He has worked on government subsidy instruments in renewable energy industry and agriculture as well as optimal control of diagnostic systems such as nurse triage.

  • Forrest W. Crawford

    Associate Professor of Biostatistics and of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and of Management

    Forrest Crawford's work focuses on mathematical and statistical problems related to discrete structures and stochastic processes in epidemiology, public health, biomedicine, and evolutionary science.

  • Gregg Gonsalves

    Assistant Professor of Epidemiology (Microbial Diseases); Associate (Adjunct) Professor of Law, Yale Law School; Co-Director, Global Health Justice Partnership; Co-Director, Collaboration for Research Integrity and Transparency

    Gregg Gonsalves is an Assistant Professor in Epidemiology of Microbial Diseases as well as an Associate (Adjunct) Professor of Law and Research Scholar in Law at Yale Law School, co-director of the Yale Law School/Yale School of Public Health Global Health Justice Partnership and the Yale Law School/Yale School of Public Health/Yale Medical School Collaboration for Research Integrity and Transparency. His research focuses on the use of quantitative models for improving the response to epidemic diseases. For more than 20 years, he worked on HIV/AIDS and other global health issues with several organizations, including the AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power, the Treatment Action Group, Gay Men’s Health Crisis, and the AIDS and Rights Alliance for Southern Africa. He was also a fellow at the Open Society Foundations and in the Department of Global Health and Social Medicine at Harvard Medical School from 2011-2012. He is a 2011 graduate of Yale College and received his PhD from Yale Graduate School of Arts and Sciences/School of Public Health in 2017.

  • Vahideh Hosseinikhah Manshadi

    Associate Professor of Operations

    Professor Manshadi’s research interests include real-time decision-making and dynamic optimization under uncertainty with various applications, such as online markets, health-care operations, and maritime port logistics, as well as matching markets and social networks.

  • Edward Kaplan

    William N. and Marie A. Beach Professor of Operations Research and Professor of Public Health; Professor of Engineering; Professor of Public Health

    Edward H. Kaplan obtained his BA from McGill University with First Class Honors in Economic and Urban Geography, and proceeded to graduate study at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology where he completed three masters’ degrees (in Operations Research, City Planning, and Mathematics) in addition to his doctorate in Urban Studies. He currently serves as the William N. and Marie A. Beach Professor of Management Sciences at the Yale School of Management, Professor of Public Health at the Yale School of Medicine, and Professor of Engineering in the Yale School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. An elected member of both the National Academy of Engineering (2003) and the Institute of Medicine (2004), Kaplan is an expert in operations research, mathematical modeling and statistics who studies problems in public policy and management. His recent research has focused on counterterror topics such as the tactical prevention of suicide bombings, bioterror preparedness, and response logistics in the event of a smallpox or anthrax attack. His work on smallpox was awarded the 2003 Koopman Prize of the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS) Military Applications Society, while his models evaluating suicide-bomber-detector schemes received the same award in 2005. Kaplan serves on the National Academy of Sciences panel on basic research to improve intelligence analysis, and co-directs the Daniel Rose Technion-Yale Initiative in Homeland Security and Counter Terror Operations Research. Kaplan has also conducted award-winning research that evaluates the effectiveness of HIV prevention programs while developing new mathematical models for the study of HIV transmission, prevention, and resource allocation. His empirical and modeling research demonstrating the effectiveness of New Haven’s needle exchange program remains among the most creative and important examples of HIV prevention program evaluation to date. Honors for his HIV-related research include induction into the Omega Rho operations research honor society in 2000, the 2002 INFORMS President’s Award recognizing work that advances the welfare of society, the 1997 Ira Hiscock Award of the Connecticut Public Health Association, the 1994 Lanchester Prize for the best publications in the operations research literature, the 1992 Franz Edelman Award for management science achievement, the 1991 State of Connecticut Health Department’s AIDS Leadership Award, the 2009 Charles C. Shepard Science Award from the Centers for Disease Control, and the INFORMS Philip Morse Lectureship for 2010-11. Kaplan served twice as the Lady Davis Visiting Professor at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem—in the School of Public Health and Community Medicine in 1994, and in the Department of Statistics in 1997 -- and is also an elected member of the Board of Governors of the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology. For all of his contributions to the operations research profession, Kaplan was designated an INFORMS Fellow in November 2005.

  • Edieal Pinker

    Deputy Dean and BearingPoint Professor of Operations Research

    Professor Pinker’s research in healthcare looks at questions related to patient flow and capacity management within both in-patient and out-patient settings. In the out-patient setting he has studied the division of labor in primary care practices and advanced access appointment scheduling systems. In the in-patient setting he has studied how bed configurations can impact access to care and how congestion in ICUs impacts patient flow. He is currently involved in several projects investigating the use of the Rothman Index as a predictive tool to inform clinical decision making. Outside of healthcare he has done research on service supply chains, the use of flexible workforces, online auctions and responses to terrorist threats among others. He serves on the editorial boards of several leading journals in his field. Pinker has consulted for the United States Postal Service, the financial services industry and the auto industry. His work has been published in leading journals such as Operations Research, Management Science, Manufacturing and Service Operations Management, IIE Transactions, Production and Operations Management, and the Communications of the Association of Computing Machinery.

  • Virginia Pitzer

    Associate Professor of Epidemiology (Microbial Diseases)

    Virginia Pitzer, joined the Yale School of Public Health as an assistant professor in 2012. She earned her Sc.D. in Epidemiology from the Harvard School of Public Health in 2007, and was a postdoctoral research fellow at Princeton (Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology) and a postdoctoral fellow in the Research and Policy for Infectious Disease Dynamics (RAPIDD) program at the Fogarty International Center of the National Institutes of Health prior to coming to Yale.

    Pitzer’s work focuses on mathematical modeling of the transmission dynamics of imperfectly immunizing infections and how interventions such as vaccination, improved treatment of cases, and improvements in sanitation affect disease transmission at the population level. Her primary research is in rotavirus, (one of the leading causes of severe diarrhea in children in developed and developing countries) for which two new vaccines have been recently introduced. She is also interested in the spatiotemporal dynamics of respiratory syncytial virus and evaluating control options for typhoid fever. Her paper Demographic Variability, Vaccination, and the Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Rotavirus Epidemics appeared in Science magazine in 2009.

  • Jeffrey Townsend

    Elihu Professor of Biostatistics and Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

    Professor Townsend received his Ph.D. in 2002 in organismic and evolutionary biology from Harvard University, under the advisement of Daniel Hartl. His Ph.D. was entitled "Population genetic variation in genome-wide gene expression: modeling, measurement, and analysis", and constituted the first population genetic analysis of genome-wide gene expression variation. After making use of the model budding yeast S. cerevisiae for his Ph.D. research, Dr. Townsend accepted an appointment as a Miller Fellow at the University of California-Berkeley in the Department of Plant and Microbial Biology, where he worked to develop molecular tools, techniques, and analysis methodologies for functional genomics studies with the filamentous fungal model species Neurospora crassa, co-advised by Berkeley fungal evolutionary biologist John Taylor and molecular mycologist Louise Glass. In 2004, he accepted his first appointment as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology at the University of Connecticut. In 2006 he was appointed as an Assistant Professor the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at Yale University. In 2013 he began to work on statistical approaches to fit mathematical models of disease spread and emergence, and to work on the somatic evolution of cancer, and was appointed as an Associate Professor of Biostatistics and Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, in 2017 he was named Elihu Associate Professor of Biostatistics and Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, and in 2018 he was appointed Elihu Professor of Biostatistics and Ecology & Evolutionary Biology.

  • Joshua Wallach

    Assistant Professor of Epidemiology (Environmental Health)

    Dr. Wallach’s research focuses on synthesizing, evaluating, and establishing the best evidence to inform research, regulatory, and public health decisions. His primary area of research, known as meta-research (i.e. the study of research itself), includes the key thematic areas of research methods, reporting/transparency, and reproducibility. Dr. Wallach’s research interests include meta-analytical methodology, evaluating study biases, clinical trial design/conduct, pharmacoepidemiology, and regulatory science. His work with the Collaboration for Research Integrity and Transparency (CRIT) at Yale focuses on evaluating the tools, standards, and approaches used to assess the safety, efficacy, quality, and performance of FDA-regulated products using epidemiologic and meta-research methods. Dr. Wallach is also a Faculty Affiliate of the Meta-Research Innovation Center at Stanford (METRICS). He is currently working to create a meta-research group within the Department of Environmental Health Sciences, with a particular focus on environmental exposure/climate change related research.    

  • Shi-Yi Wang

    Associate Professor of Epidemiology (Chronic Disease)

    Dr. Wang is an Associate Professor at the Yale School of Public Health, faculty member of Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy and Effectiveness Research (COPPER) Center, and faculty member of Public Health Modeling Concentration, Yale School of Public Health. His primary interests focus on outcomes research and decision science. He is interested in combining systematic literature reviews, secondary data analyses, and simulation modeling to examine issues that are critical to clinicians and policy makers’ decision making. He has been working on several breast cancer projects, including an evaluation of preoperative breast MRI, development of an individualized decision aid to help radiotherapy decision-making, and assessment of sentinel lymph node biopsy for patients with ductal carcinoma in situ. He is also evaluating end-of-life care quality. He serves as the primary investigator or co-investigator in several projects (funded by Yale Cancer Center, AHRQ, NCI, ACS, and PCORI).

  • Joshua Warren

    Associate Professor of Biostatistics (Biostatistics)

    Joshua Warren is an associate professor in the Department of Biostatistics at the Yale School of Public Health. He received his Ph.D. in statistics from North Carolina State University in 2011. Dr. Warren’s research focuses on statistical methods in public health with an emphasis on environmental health problems. Much of his work involves introducing spatial and spatiotemporal models in the Bayesian setting to learn more about associations between environmental exposures, such as air pollution, and various health outcomes including preterm birth, low birth weight, and congenital anomalies. He also has interest in developing and applying spatiotemporal models in collaborative settings such as epidemiology, geography, nutrition, and glaucoma research. His theoretical and methodological interests include multiple topics in spatial/spatiotemporal modeling and Bayesian nonparameterics.

  • Daniel Weinberger

    Associate Professor of Epidemiology (Microbial Diseases)

    Dan Weinberger joined the faculty at Yale School of Public Health in 2013. He earned his PhD in biological sciences from Harvard School of Public Health in 2009 with a focus on microbiology and infectious disease epidemiology. He was then a postdoctoral fellow in the Division of International Epidemiology and Population Studies in the Fogarty International Center, NIH until 2012.

    Research: The research in the Weinberger Lab is at the intersection of microbiology and epidemiology. We focus on understanding the biological and epidemiological drivers of respiratory infections, including pneumococcus, RSV, influenza, and Legionella. Major research areas include understanding the biological drivers of the emergence of rare pneumococcal serotypes following vaccine introduction, developing novel statistical approaches to evaluate vaccine impact from observational data, evaluating the importance of interactions among respiratory pathogens, and understanding environmental drivers of Legionellosis. We employ a variety of tools including experimental and quantitative approaches. Our work is funded by grants from the NIH/NIAID, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, and the Emerging Infections Program (a collaboration between the CDC, the Connecticut Department of Public Health, and Yale). You can learn more about our research here.

    Teaching: I teach the Public Health Surveillance course at YSPH. This class uses a mix of lectures, cases studies, and hands on data analysis exercises. Students learn to perform common surveillance analyses including aberration detection (e.g., CUSUM), time series analysis, and spatial cluster detection (SATSCAN). Students learn to do these analyses in either SAS or R. There are many great resources available for students learning these types of software including https://stats.idre.ucla.edu/ and https://www.datacamp.com/

  • Reza Yaesoubi

    Assistant Professor of Public Health (Health Policy)

    Dr. Yaesoubi’s research focuses on medical decision making and model-based evaluation of health policies. His work incorporates mathematical and computer simulation models, statistical methods, and optimization techniques to guide resource allocation and decision making in public health and health delivery systems. He has applied these methods in conducting cost-effectiveness analyses of colorectal cancer screening strategies, estimating societal willingness-to-pay for health, and characterizing performance-based payment systems for preventive care systems. His current work mainly focuses on adaptive decision making to control the spread of infectious diseases including tuberculosis, influenza, and meningitis. He is also interested in theoretical and methodological issues in medical decision making including cost-effectiveness analysis, large-scale simulation modeling, Markov decision processes, approximate dynamic programming, game theory, and principal-agent models.